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Glendale’s Brand Park, Part 2

The lone bit of news that I have for you today is that 737 Palm Dr. is finally in escrow. Whew! Listed at $620,000 as a bank foreclosure – it was a good deal for someone. Also, I heard a rumor that the house at 2050 Rangeview had a multiple offers. It is still showing as active, though.

Here is Part 2 of the History of Brand Park:

Whispering Pine Tea House

The traditional teahouse was built in 1974 through the combined efforts of the Sister Cities of Glendale and Higashi-Osaka, Japan. It is one of the few traditional Japanese Teahouses open to the public in the United States. Given the name “Shoseian” or “Whispering Pine Teahouse” by the Fifteenth Grand Tea Master of the Urasenke School of Tea in Japan, the Teahouse is designated an official Tearoom. Dr.Yamazaki of Higashi-Osaka provided initial support for the Teahouse and Gardens. The Teahouse, which was designed by architect Hayahiko Takase, is a unique blending of western and eastern design and an apt expression of the spirit of cross-cultural community.

The garden and koi pond are open Monday – Thursday, 10am – 3 pm and the teahouse is open by reservation every 3rd Sunday for events related to Asian arts and culture. Click here for a to see a video tour of the Friendship Garden and Teahouse.

The Doctor’s House

The Doctors House, an authentically restored Queen Anne-Eastlake style home built about 1888, is the result of a community-wide endeavor to preserve a reminder of Glendale’s earliest days. The two story house originally stood at 921 East Wilson Avenue. It became known as The Doctors House because it was residence and office space for three prominent early Glendale physicians. Before this time the home was occupied by Nell Shipman, a significant Canadian silent screen star. She is best known for her work in James Oliver Curwood stories and for portraying strong, adventurous women.

When it was threatened with demolition in 1979, citizens, including the newly reconstituted Glendale Historical Society, banded together to relocate it to Brand Park. They then restored the house to its late 19th century appearance, and furnished and decorated it in the style of the period. Today the Doctors House serves as a museum and popular spot for community events during the holidays. Click here for an amazing pictorial tour of the house.

Tomorrow I will share the last part of the article.  Have an awesome day today and keep cool!

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